Australian Nanotechnology Alliance

In This Issue

Announcements

ANA announces the release of Nanotechnology: Australian Capability Report Fourth Edition.
First 2011 Networking Event to be held at the Australian Synchrotron.

Research News

CSIRO chemist on world's top 100 list
CSIRO Fellow Dr Ezio Rizzardo has been ranked as one of the world's Top 100 Chemists over the past decade, by US information and analysis company, Thomson Reuters.
Realising the health benefits from research
Eighteen teams of researchers will be given the opportunity to develop their discoveries into products to improve human health thanks to $7.4 million of Australian Government support.

Know your material

Invisible diamonds at the Australian Synchrotron
Researchers are developing films containing millions of tiny diamond crystals to harness their exceptional hardness and heat conductivity for new industrial purposes. More versatile than large single crystals, these films can be deposited on silicon, steel or other surfaces

Tin Tacks

New solar manufacturing facility for the Gold Coast
Eco-Kinetics, a leading solar manufacturing company, will construct a cutting-edge facility on the Gold Coast to assemble photovoltaic modules and manufactured mounting kits

Sensational Materials

New nanomaterials may lead to next-generation electronic devices
US and Australian show the promise of surface-conduction channels in topological insulator nanoribbons made of bismuth telluride, and demonstrate that surface states in these nanoribbons are "tunable" - able to be turned on and off depending on the position of the Fermi level.
New report on Global nanomaterials industry
A new market research report on the Global Nanomaterials Industry was released in February 2011.
Buckyball puzzles prove a hit with the kids (both big and small)
Approximately 35,000 Buckyball puzzles designed by the ANA and the ARCCFN have been distributed around Australia.

Ian's Corner

Ian Gentle

The ANA is very pleased that the most recent edition of the Nanotechnology: Australian Capability Report, which the ANA prepared for the Commonwealth Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research has now been released. As reported later in this newsletter, a PDF version of the document can be downloaded from the ANA website and I encourage you to look through the document and make contact with the relevant industry, research and government organisations included. Also recently we have completed a series of case studies on prominent Australian nanotechnology companies which can also be viewed on the ANA website.

Those companies included in the case study series include:

  • The Australian Synchrotron - Invisible diamonds
  • CAP-XX - Digital power for mobile devices
  • Ceramic Fuel Cells - Eco-friendly power generation
  • Dyesol - The sunshine sponge
  • MiniFAB - Minifabrication using nanotechnology
  • Nanofilm - Pure, clean water for the sunburnt country
  • RPO - Touching nanotechnology
  • Seagull Technologies - Needle-free drug delivery for eye diseases
  • Starpharma - Fighting disease with nanotech
  • TenasiTech - Stretchy but strong plastics
  • Very Small Particle Company - Big environmental outcomes using very small particles

If you are interested in having a case study promoted on the ANA website, I encourage you to look at the format and supply information and photos to me. At the ANA we believe the research/commercial relationship is critical and are committed to promoting it in any way we can, be it through our case study series or through our regular networking events, the Executive Series.

The Executive Series will soon recommence with an exciting program using our format of an industry and a research speaker looking at key areas that showcase nanotechnology. We thank Davies Collison Cave Patent Attorneys for their continuing support of this program. There will also be new ANA faces at the Executive Series events. Gary Day, who represents the ANA in Melbourne, will be looking after events in that city along with Hobart. ANA board members Aidan Dargan (Boeing) and John Bell (QUT) will look after the Brisbane series, and Carla Gerbo (Australian Centre for Nanomedicine UNSW) will manage the Sydney program.

I would like to close this month’s “corner” highlighting the ANA Board members that were appointed late last year. Working with me are:

  • Aidan Dargan (Vice President) - Boeing Australia Ltd
  • Isaac Spedding (Secretary) - Acme Nano
  • John Bell (Treasurer) - QUT
  • Peter Kambouris (Director) - CSIRO
  • Carla Gerbo (Director) - Australian Centre for Nanomedicine UNSW
  • Andrew Dark (Director) - Fisher Adams Kelly Patent Attorneys
  • Stewart McGlashan (Director)

In the next twelve months we will be working hard to promote all aspects of nanotechnology and I look forward to meeting up with many of you.

I’m just an email or phone call away (07 3365 3829 or i.gentle@uq.edu.au).

Ian Gentle (Professor)
President - Australian Nanotechnology Alliance


Event Calendar

March 2011
April 2011
May 2011
June 2011
July 2011
August 2011
September 2011
August 2011
November 2011
December 2011

For more information on international conferences in minerals, metals & materials click here


Notice Board

  • Applications have opened for the 2012 International Fulbright Science & Technology Awards (IS&T). Valued at up to US$300,000 IS&T Awards are open to Australian citizens to undertake a full PhD program in the United States. The Award can be started between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012. View www.fulbright.com.au, applications close 1st May 2011.
  • Innovate SA is calling for applications for the BSA Energy Efficiency Program aimed at small-to-medium South Australian companies committed to energy efficiency to help reduce their energy usage and related costs. Round 1 is open from 24th January 2011 to 18th February 2011. For more information or to apply, visit the BSA website or email bsa@innovatesa.com.au.
  • Applications are currently open for the 2010-11 Queensland-Smithsonian Fellowships. The Program provides Fellowships each year to enable Queenslanders to undertake research projects at the Smithsonian Institution, the world's largest museum complex and research organisation. Up to three Fellowships will be awarded in 2010-11. The duration of a Fellowship is for a maximum of 26 weeks and a minimum of 13 weeks, with a maximum award of $30,000. Applications are open to Queenslanders working in areas of mutual interest with the Smithsonian, in particular:
    • evolutionary, systematic, behavioural and environmental biology;
    • biodiversity, conservation and climate change;
    • earth and mineral sciences;
    • anthropology, archaeology and Indigenous and cross-cultural studies;
    • science and technology;
    • art and design;
    • museum based education, science education; and
    • museum outreach; and museum management and practice.
    Applications close 5pm 11 March 2011. Guidelines and application form can be found at science.qld.gov.au/international.
  • The Australia-Korea Foundation (AKF), the Australian Academy of Science, the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering invite applications for their Early Career Science and Technology Researchers (ECR) program. The ECR program has been created to enhance Australia-Korea links in science and technology. For more information and to access application forms, please visit www.science.org.au/internat/asia/akf-ecr.html. Closing date: 5pm Friday 18 March 2011
  • The Australia-China Council (ACC) invites Expressions of Interest for grant applications from organisations and individuals for projects. In 2011-12 priority will be given to projects which seek to strengthen Australia’s relationship with China in the areas of education and science, economics and trade and society and culture. The on-line Expression of Interest form and funding guidelines are available at http://www.dfat.gov.au/acc. The closing time and date for the lodgement of applications is 5.00 pm (AEDST) Wednesday 30 March 2011.

Australian Nanotechnology Alliance
8/108-110 Boyce Road
MAROUBRA NSW 2035

Phone: 0413 441 276 • Email: info@nanotechnology.org.auWeb: www.nanotechnology.org.au

Newsletter Editor: Gary Day


Australian Nanotechnology Alliance Announcements

ANA announces the release of Nanotechnology: Australian Capability Report Fourth Edition

ANA Capability Report

The Australian Nanotechnology Alliance was commissioned in the second half of 2010 by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research under the National Enabling Technologies Strategy to create the Fourth Edition of Nanotechnology: Australian Capability Report. This report is now available.

Australia is making a name for itself in materials, nanobiotechnology, electronics and photonics, energy and environment and quantum technology. Australia’s smart, enterprising population, robust R&D infrastructure, supportive government and stringent IP protection make it an attractive location to establish and conduct research activities. Collaboration is a defining feature of the Australian nanotechnology sector. The country’s research institutes and private companies have formed strong alliances to bring products with commercial and social benefits to market quickly.

The Fourth Edition of Nanotechnology: Australian Capability Report contains the most up to date information on the Australian nanotechnology sector currently available. The new directory style of this Edition allows the reader to easily find relevant information, and the Australian Nanotechnology Matrix towards the end of the Report provides a useful summary of all relevant areas for each organisation listed.

The Report maintains the seven categories of the Third Edition, while broadening the scope to include new categories of Government Resources and Consultancy Services. There are over 300 entries for companies, research organisations and Government bodies over nine categories:

  • Materials
  • Nanobiotechnology and medical devices
  • Energy and environment
  • Electronics and photonics
  • Quantum technology
  • Instrumentation and software
  • Facilities, networks and associations
  • Government resources
  • Consultancy services

A pdf version of this report can be downloaded from the ANA website

Please contact the Australian Nanotechnology Alliance if you wish to obtain a print version of this report.

First 2011 Networking Event to be held at the Australian Synchrotron

The successful industry-research networking ANA has been organising for several years, in conjunction with Davies Collison Cave patent, trademark and intellectual property attorneys, will be kicking off their 2011 events season with an event to be held at the Australian Synchrotron on Thursday March 31.

The networking event will include presenters from the Australian Synchrotron and industry, and will include a tour of the facility. Further details will be sent out in the next week, so keep an eye out.


Research News

CSIRO chemist on world's top 100 list

CSIRO Fellow Dr Ezio Rizzardo has been ranked as one of the world's Top 100 Chemists over the past decade, by US information and analysis company, Thomson Reuters.

Published to mark the International Year of Chemistry, 2011 (IYC2011), the list was compiled on the basis of the highest citation impact scores for chemistry papers (articles and reviews) published by individual chemists between 2000 and 2010.

Under that criteria, Thompson Reuters ranked Dr Rizzardo at 18th.

The company said that as approximately a million chemists were recorded in the journal publications it indexed during the last decade, the Top 100 Chemists list represented the top hundredth of one percent.

Dr Rizzardo published 52 papers, had 91.2 citations per paper and was the only Australian to be ranked in the top 20. CSIRO was the only Australian research organisation to be named on the list.

Dr Rizzardo’s research has focused on developing methods for controlling free radical polymerisation. His breakthrough Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) technology has led to the development of an entirely new area of science.

RAFT is now one of the most studied areas in polymer science with more than 10,000 journal publications appearing during the past decade.

Commercially there are over 500 active patents using RAFT with new products being both commercialised and researched in a range of fields including: drug delivery; biocompatible materials with increased function; paints and coatings to meet stricter environmental guidelines; targeted personal care and cosmetics; synthetic rubbers for improved performance; and, additives to promote fuel efficiency.

Source: CSIRO press release 02.03.11

Realising the health benefits from research

Eighteen teams of researchers will be given the opportunity to develop their discoveries into products to improve human health thanks to $7.4 million of Australian Government support.

Minister for Mental Health and Ageing Mark Butler announced the recipients of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Development Grants today.

Mr Butler said that Australia excels in health and medical research, however putting this research into practice is a continual challenge.

“These grants allow successful researchers to take the next steps in translating their findings in areas such as biotechnology, medical devices and pharmaceuticals into products of benefit to Australia and internationally.

“These innovative projects have the potential to support new high tech industries and boost our profile on the world stage. They will benefit both our health and our economic future,” he said.

Amongst the 18 initiatives are projects that will improve diagnosis of cancer, develop nano-particles that can be used in identifying narrowed blood vessels and treatments for spinal cord injuries.

One project, led by Dr Sebastian Carotta of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, will receive $382,524 to develop a system to grow red blood cells from human stem cells.

“This new technology has the potential to overcome the problems of the limited supply and shelf-life of donated blood, to ensure that the correct blood type is available when and where it is needed to provide life-saving blood transfusions,” Mr Butler said.

Source: Ministerial media release 10.02.11


Know your materials

Invisible diamonds at the Australian Synchrotron

It’s common knowledge that diamonds are a girl’s best friend. Less glamorous than diamonds for decoration, but more valuable on an industrial scale are nanodiamonds, so small that thousands could fit in a space no wider than a human hair.

Researchers are developing films containing millions of tiny diamond crystals to harness their exceptional hardness and heat conductivity for new industrial purposes. More versatile than large single crystals, these films can be deposited on silicon, steel or other surfaces.

At the Australian Synchrotron, the synchrotron X-rays are providing the analytical tools and production methods to realise the potential of new diamond applications such as protective films for knife edges, electron emission devices, heat sinks for solid state lasers and thermoelectric energy converters to generate power from waste heat. Nanodiamonds can also generate photons for quantum communication and cryptographic devices being developed for secure telecommunications. They have also opened up new avenues in medical imaging, dramatically enhancing signal intensity, yielding a more vivid image contrast than was previously possible.

The Australian Synchrotron uses electricity to produce intense beams of light a million times brighter than the sun. The light is produced when high-energy electrons are forced to travel in a circular orbit inside the synchrotron tunnels by ‘synchronised’ application of strong magnetic fields.

The electron beams travel at just under the speed of light - about 299,792 kilometres per second. The intense light they produce is filtered and adjusted to travel into experimental workstations, where the light reveals the innermost, sub-microscopic secrets of a vast range of materials, including diamonds.

The above story is a modified version of a recent case study produced on the Australian Synchrotron by the Australian Nanotechnology Alliance.


Tin Tacks

New solar manufacturing facility for the Gold Coast

Eco-Kinetics, a leading solar manufacturing company, will construct a cutting-edge facility on the Gold Coast to assemble photovoltaic modules and manufactured mounting kits.

Eco-Kinetics, a subsidiary of ASX-listed CBD Energy Ltd., currently assembles products offshore but will eventually move all of its production of solar panels to Queensland, creating an estimated 240 jobs between now and 2015.

Incentives from the Queensland Government and Gold Coast Council have lured solar manufacturer to the developing Yatala Enterprise Area, and the facility is expected to be up and running in April.

Eco-Kinetics commercial manager Rick McElhinney said the Queensland facility was big enough to produce 360,000 panels a year. The company has won export orders, including a $300 million solar project in Thailand with prospects in India and Italy.

Source: Queensland Government media release 17.02.11, Gold Coast City Council media release 18.02.11


Sensational Materials

New nanomaterials may lead to next-generation electronic devices

Bismuth telluride

Researchers from UCLA's Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and from the University of Queensland show the promise of surface-conduction channels in topological insulator nanoribbons made of bismuth telluride and demonstrate that surface states in these nanoribbons are "tunable" - able to be turned on and off depending on the position of the Fermi level.

Our finding enables a variety of opportunities in building potential new-generation, low-dissipation nanoelectronic and spintronic devices, from magnetic sensing to storage," said Kang L. Wang.

"Our finding enables a variety of opportunities in building potential new-generation, low-dissipation nanoelectronic and spintronic devices, from magnetic sensing to storage," said Kang L. Wang.

With their large surface-to-volume ratios, these topological insulator nanoribbons significantly enhance surface conditions and enable surface manipulation by external means.

Wang and his team used thin bismuth telluride nanoribbons as conducting channels in field-effect transistor structures. These rely on an electric field to control the Fermi level and hence the conductivity of a channel.

"We have demonstrated a clear surface conduction by partially removing the bulk conduction using an external electric field," said Faxian Xiu.

"By properly tuning the gate voltage, very high surface conduction was achieved, up to 51 percent, which represents the highest values in topological insulators."

The new findings shed light on the controllability of the surface spin states in topological insulator nanoribbons and demonstrate significant progress toward high surface electric conditions for practical device applications.

Study collaborators Professor Jin Zou, from the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering (Materials Engineering) and the Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, at the University of Queensland; Yong Wang, a Queensland International Fellow; and Professor Zou's team at the University of Queensland contributed significantly to this work.

The next step for Wang's team is to produce high-speed devices based on their discovery.

The study is published Feb. 13 in Nature Nanotechnology.

New report on Global nanomaterials industry

A new market research report on the Global Nanomaterials Industry was released in February 2011. The report analyses the worldwide markets for Nanomaterials in US$ million by the following product segments:

  • Nanomaterial Oxides
  • Nano-Metals
  • Carbon Nanotubes
  • Nanomaterial Clays
  • Others (including Nanominerals, Nanocrystalline Materials, Nanowires, Quantum Dots, Dendrimers, and Polymer Nanocomposites)

The major end use segments discussed are Electronics, Healthcare, Construction, and Others (Aerospace & Defence, Automobile, Cutting Tools, and Energy).

The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Japan, Western Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest of World. Annual estimates and forecasts are provided for the period 2007 through 2015. A five-year historic analysis is also provided for these markets.

The report also profiles 238 companies including many key and niche players such as AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Inc., AlSher Titania LLC, Advanced Nano Products Co., Limited, Antaria Limited, Apex Nanomaterials, ApNano Materials, Inc., Cabot Corporation, Catalytic Materials LLC, Dendritic Nanotechnologies, Inc., eSpin Technologies, Inc., Hodogaya Chemical Co., LTD., Hanwha Nanotech Corporation, Hyperion Catalysis International, Inc., InMat, Inc., Integran Technologies, Inc., Luna nanoWorks, MicrotechNano, Inc., Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation, Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Company, Inc., Nanoledge, NovaCentrix, Corp., Nanophase Technologies Corp., Nyacol Nano Technologies, Inc., Oxonica Plc, QuantumSphere, Inc., Rosseter Holdings Ltd., Shenzhen Nanotech Port Co., Ltd., Sun Nanotech Company Limited, Unidym, Inc., and Xintek, Inc.

Market data and analytics are derived from primary and secondary research. Company profiles are mostly extracted from URL research and reported select online sources.

More information can be obtained from www.reportlinker.com.

Buckyball puzzles prove a hit with the kids (both big and small)

Inmid-2010 the Australian Nanotechnology Alliance and the Australian Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials were commissioned by the Federal Government Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research to create a learning tool for nanotechnology. What was created was the Buckyball puzzle, a 3-dimensional, hands on interactive puzzle which when finished take the shape of a Buckyball.

The Buckball puzzles proved instantly popular with kids and adults alike. Since creation, approximately 35,000 of these Buckyball puzzles have been printed and distributed around Australia.

On the puzzle itself, useful information concerning nanotechnology can be read on both sides of the flat puzzle sheet before being put together. There are also visually appealing, colourised electron microscope pictures of various nanomaterial structures on both sides.

Contact the ANA to obtain one (or several) of these Buckyball puzzles.